5 Must-Have Elements of a Kick-Ass Blog Post

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5 Must-Have Elements of a Kick-Ass Blog Post - Writing the perfect blog post isn't hard if you keep your goals in mind and build it layer by layer to entertain readers and keep them reading until the end. Writing a kick-ass blog post is kind of like baking the perfect lasagna. You have to start with all the right ingredients, and then you need to layer them one by one to create a finished product that not only looks good from the outside but has interest all the way through.

Now, in this analogy, the headline would be the mozzarella cheese on top – it’s what looks beautiful and yummy and draws your attention to get you to cut in and try a piece. If the headline doesn’t look good, there’s a good chance no one will ever taste your lasagna… er, I mean read your post 😀

But once you get them to open it up, what ingredients do you need to keep them reading? How do you layer your blog post in a way that makes readers want to eat it up?

In this post, I’m going to talk about the ingredients you need for your blog post; the elements that will help you build that perfect, mouth-watering piece of content that not only keeps people reading until the last morsel, but will have them coming back for seconds.

 

Introduction

Every post needs to start with an irresistible introduction. Your headline is going to get them to click on your link, but if the intro doesn’t capture their interest within the first couple of lines, it’s unlikely they’ll read the rest of the post. On the other hand, if you can get them hooked with your preface, they’re more likely to read the whole thing.

There are different things you can do in your intro – it’s not a one size fits all kind of thing. You can tell a story, or tell a joke – there are many ways to create an instant connection with the reader. But what’s important is that your introduction builds on the desire to keep reading.

 

Use Subheadings To Break Things Up

One of the worst things you can do in a blog post is have a huge wall of text. That works ok in a book, but on the internet it’s very difficult to read – and if it’s hard to read, people will hit the back button and look for something easier.

Break your text up into easy to read chunks. This is called “post segmentation” if you want to get all fancy-schmancy about it. See how I’ve got large, bold subheadings for each section? That creates visual interest and draws the eye down. Pauline Cabrera over at Twelveskip did a great post on why subheadings are so important.

Paragraphs should be short – 2 or 3 sentences is best. You want to have plenty of line breaks and white space to make it easy to read.

 

Interesting Images

The images you use on your post will also help keep the reader on the page. Use Picmonkey to add a quote from your post to an appropriate image – it draws interest to that section of the post.

Images are important for several other reasons – for one thing, there’s a lot of similar content on the web, and your images can make yours stand out. And when you do them right, they help your SEO.

 

Add More Visual Interest

You can keep your readers on the page with more than just images and bold subheadings.

Add in –

  • Text boxes and “Click-to-Tweets”
  • Bullet points
  • Numbered lists
  • (see what I did here?)

 

 

Call to Action

Your kick-ass blog post doesn’t really matter much if it doesn’t get your reader to do something – and they likely aren’t going to do anything if you don’t tell them what to do!

Telling them what to do is called a “Call to Action” (CTA) and it can be something as simple as saying “What do you think? Tell me in the comments below!” or “If you liked this, please use the buttons below to share it with your friends!”

All my posts have an opt-in CTA at the bottom, asking people to sign up for my email newsletter. To me, that’s the most important thing on my blog – and it probably should be on yours, too.

The purpose of your blog post should be to educate, entertain and solve problems – but it’s not going to do any of that if people don’t read it. By making sure you have each of these essential elements in your blog post, you’ll give yourself the best possible chance of not only keeping a reader on the page, but turning them into a regular reader.

And hey – if you liked this post, make sure you share it! 😉

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The Pretty Pintastic Party #56
The Pretty Pintastic Party #55

16 responses on 5 Must-Have Elements of a Kick-Ass Blog Post

    1. Absolutely, Elna. I really dislike trying to read giant walls of text, or when the text goes all the way from the left to the right side of my monitor – it’s so hard to read!

    1. If your blog is WordPress, it’s a plug in. Go to Plugins > Add New, and search for ‘click to tweet’, then click on “Install Now”.

      Once it’s installed, it adds a little button with a Twitter bird on it to your post editor. Click that button, type in what you want your tweet to say – it’s as easy as that!

  1. These are great tips! I have a hard time remembering the CTA. It is a simple as asking a question and inviting opinions so I need to remember it more.

    1. Thanks, Julie! I’ve had a problem with that too – that’s why I make sure I’ve got my optin form on every post, if I forget to say something, I know at the very least, I’ve got that cta going on. Thanks for commenting!

  2. Love your lasagna, Kelly! 🙂 These are great tips, but I keep forgetting most of them. I think I could go back and apply all of these to several months worth of posts, re-post them, and no one would ever know they were recycled! Especially the “wall of text,” the headlines, the images, the…well, ALL of it! Pinning this so I can make a checklist out of it — thank you!
    Wendy recently posted…The ONE Challenge You Must Accept…Because There Should Be No RegretsMy Profile

    1. It’s AMAZING what a good headline can do – and now with Pinterest, the image can be just as important. Now go make some lasagna 😉

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